Where Do You Stand? A Question of Character

Where Do You Stand? A Question of Character
by Doug Hines

It is an age old story. It has been with us since ancient times. It was the reason Moses came down from the mountain with the Ten Commandments.
Common interest vs. Self interest.
A society in chaos is one in which the people with common interest, i.e. a desire for the common good, making decisions and living their lives to the benefit of all, have been over-run by people with self interest, who put their success above the good of all.
I watched a perfectly healthy man pull his Lexus into a handicapped parking space at the grocery store. His car had no visor or license tag granting him special use of the disabled parking area. He was perfectly content to put his personal interests above the common interests of others. He produced the desired results for himself and was rewarded for his ill action... while someone else suffered.
Multiply this man's decision for self interest by the millions and millions of decisions that are made in this world daily, and you can begin to realize the magnitude of the problem. We are a society in which people choose self interest above common interest, just like in Biblical times.
The old adage of "A house divided cannot not stand" now takes on new meaning. We are faced with a choice of either continuing our society, or of having it disintegrate into chaos.
Rule-breakers have never had any intention of following any "Commandments." Doing so doesn't serve them. Society cannot be corrected using force, not even the force of law written in stone. People will only change when they see that change is in their self interest.
I am not proposing more rules to curb self interest decision making. I am simply asking everyone to consider where our present course of action is leading us.
How do you relate to your fellow human being? Is this a me vs. them world to you, or will you take a stand that all of us will benefit by having lived by your side?

Doug Hines, from Hagerstown, is a student at Clayton College of Natural Health. This article is published with his permission.