Hager House Program Features Early American Burial Customs

Hager House Program Features Early American Burial Customs

Hagerstown, MD (October 9, 2007)- Did you know that in the 18th century it was believed that women should not attend funerals if they were pregnant? That one should not wear new shoes to a funeral, and that a clap of thunder heard after a burial was a sign that the deceased individual had made his or her way to heaven?
The Jonathan Hager House and Museum presents Grim Reapings - A History Of Death In Early America on Tuesday, November 6, 2007 at 7pm. Historical Sites Facilitator, John Bryan, will discuss superstitions, folklore and customs associated with funerals and burials in the formative years of our nation. According to Bryan, "Death was so frequent among families because of the lack of medical knowledge that people developed their own superstitions based on what they observed when a loved one died. Stories soon spread, became accepted and thus quickly assimilated into popular culture."
The lecture also will include a discussion on coffin-making, premature burials, caring for the body, funeral services, tombstone carvings, mourning customs and body-snatching. Please plan to join us for an interesting and unique evening out! This lecture is free.
The Hager House is located at 110 Key St., City Park, Hagerstown, MD. For more information call 301-739-8393 or email: hagerhouse@hagerstownmd.org.