RECENT ARTICLES
    COMMUNITY CALENDAR
    BUSINESS DIRECTORY
    CLASSIFIED ADS
    PRESS RELEASES
    ARTICLE ARCHIVE
    HOME DELIVERY SUBSCRIPTION
    CONTACT US
    HOME
   
    PONY POSTAL CENTER
    REMEMBER WHEN ANTIQUES
    HAGERSTOWN AUCTIONS
   


 
 

Article Archive >> Community

Cleaning Green? Be Smart About It

Cleaning Green? Be Smart About It

(NewsUSA)- Choosing green as a personal color code for "environmentally responsible" living was a New Year's resolution made by about half of consumers polled in a nationwide survey.
They expressed their resolve in different ways: to become more "green-aware," to go natural and to promote eco-friendly activities that are good for the planet.
And with spring just around the corner, green awareness undoubtedly will guide consumers' cleaning product choices. But with so much that's being said and written about green cleaning, it's important to educate yourself about it. To help you do just that, and in time for spring cleaning, a new Web site, www.aboutcleaningproducts.com, was created by the Consumer Specialty Products Association to provide a better understanding about cleaning products.
This fact-filled, fun and easy-to-use site explains the cleaning process and different product types for bath, kitchen, laundry and general household applications. A section on "Alternative Mixtures" compares the advantages of commercial formulations to homemade cleaning solutions. A "Fact and Fiction" page helps sort out myths about cleaning products.
Aboutcleaningproducts.com also takes a look at the green phenomenon. It poses helpful questions such as: What does it mean to be green? Does green mean safe for people and animals? Does it mean that a product is made from plants and not petroleum? Is it biodegradable and recyclable?
Green means all that and more. Thinking green should include selecting cleaning products that work effectively to kill disease-carrying bacteria and are good for the environment. A product that does not work will be tossed into the trash and create more litter.
And thinking green should definitely take safe use into consideration. In well-meaning attempts to clean green, some consumers mix ammonia and bleach, a harmful combination that produces toxic gas. Mixtures like this are a common mistake and an example of good intentions gone bad.
For more information, visit www.aboutcleaningproducts.com

Printable version

<< back to Articles on Community
<< back to All Articles