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Article Archive >> Spring Tourism

Boroughs and Townships...in Fulton County

Boroughs and Townships
...in Fulton County

In many parts of Fulton County, Pennsylvania and the surrounding area is lax and comfortable. At first seem it may seem to offer little to the casual passerby. There aren't enormous towering office complexes that block out the sun's rays, nor will a quick hello between two friends on the street be drowned out by the rumble of mass transit buses and the honking horns of bumper-to-bumper cars and taxi cabs.
"Our gently rolling mountains and green fertile valleys provide a quiet, peaceful environment for numerous recreational opportunities. We enjoy over 50,000 acres of Pennsylvania State Forest land with lakes and streams that are replete with game and fish. Hunting, fishing, cycling, hiking, boating, camping, swimming, golfing, and hang-gliding are some of the popular outdoor and family activities available."
There's pleasantry and awe awaiting you in Fulton County.
McConnellsburg is the seat of Fulton County government, which was laid out in 1786. This town was incorporated into a borough on March 26, 1814. Although the town square was situated out at the intersection of Second and Market Streets, McConnellsburg's main street developed a block to the south along the main road from Philadelphia to Fort Duquesne and the western United States. The town's character is reflective of its significance as a stopping place on this great road.
Records from 1835 list 46 occupations of McConnellsburg residents directly related to the current Lincoln Highway including blacksmiths, stage coach drivers, wagon makers, merchants, wagoners, saddlers, innkeepers, drovers and wheelwright. Near McConnellsburg, on July 29, 1863, William Moore and Thomas Shelton became the first Confederate soldiers to be killed north of the Mason-Dixon Line during the Civil War. Some historic structures still in use include the Fulton County Courthouse, Fulton House, and founder Daniel McConnell's home.
Small boroughs and townships in this beautiful county include:
Valley-Hi is a borough located in Fulton County, Pennsylvania. As of the 2000 census, the borough had a total population of 20.
Ayr Township is a township located in Fulton County, Pennsylvania. As of the 2000 census, the township had a total population of 1,982.
Belfast Township is a civil township in Fulton County in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania. As of the 2000 census, the township had a total population of 1,341.
Bethel Township is a township located in Fulton County, Pennsylvania. As of the 2000 census, the township had a total population of 1,420.
Brush Creek Township is a township located in Fulton County, Pennsylvania. As of the 2000 census, the township had a total population of 730.
Dublin Township is a township located in Fulton County, Pennsylvania. As of the 2000 census, the township had a total population of 1,277.
Licking Creek Township is a township located in Fulton County, Pennsylvania. As of the 2000 census, the township had a total population of 1,532.
Taylor Township is a township located in Fulton County, Pennsylvania. As of the 2000 census, the township had a total population of 1,237.
Thompson Township is a township located in Fulton County, Pennsylvania. As of the 2000 census, the township had a total population of 998.
Todd Township is a township located in Fulton County, Pennsylvania. As of the 2000 census, the township had a total population of 1,488.
Union Township is a township located in Fulton County, Pennsylvania. As of the 2000 census, the township had a total population of 634.
Wells Township is a township located in Fulton County, Pennsylvania. As of the 2000 census, the township had a total population of 529.
Wells Tannery- In The northwestern part of Fulton County is Wells Township, among the most scenic sections of the county. By an act of the state legislature in 1850 then Aughwick Township was renamed Wells Township and transferred to the new county of Fulton.
According to published reports, the township derives its name from an early settler by the name of Wells who came from Baltimore, reportedly around 1760. A Scot-Irishman by the name of Alexander Alexander (better known as Double Alick) is thought to have been the first permanent settler, emigrating in 1763 to Greencastle in Cumberland County, then to Wells Valley in 1772.
Alexander traveled to Fort Lyttleton for milling, Fort Loudon for sale and groceries, and Carlisle for dry goods. Mr. Alexander was forced to leave his home by Indians in 1777. He then settled in McConnells Cove and moved again in 1778 to the Conococheague settlement where he remained until the close of the American Revolution.

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