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Article Archive >> Autumn Tourism

Little Known Facts about the Creeks in Washington County

Little Known Facts about the Creeks in Washington County

For any state, bays and rivers are obviously significant. In Maryland, however, creeks too become especially important. Some are the size of rivers. Often, creek waters flow directly into Chesapeake Bay, or merge with other Bay tributaries.
Antietam Creek is a tributary of the Potomac River located in south central Pennsylvania and western Maryland in the United States. The creek became famous as a focal point of the Battle of Antietam (called the Battle of Sharpsburg in the American South) during the American Civil War. The day of the battle is known as "the day Antietam Creek ran red" due to the blood of thousands of Union casualties mixing with the creek waters. The creek is formed in Franklin County, Pennsylvania at the confluence of the West and East Branches of Antietam Creek about 2.3 miles (3.7 km) south of Waynesboro, Pennsylvania. The stream runs for about 0.5 mile (0.8 km) before entering Washington County, Maryland. The total length of the creek is 41 miles (65 km).
Conococheague Creek, a tributary of the Potomac River, is a free flowing stream that originates in Pennsylvania and empties into the Potomac River in Maryland. It is approximately 80 miles in length with 58 miles in Pennsylvania and 22 miles in Maryland. The Conococheague Creek was the northernmost extent of the range along the Potomac within which Congress in the Residence Bill of 1790 authorized the establishment of the Federal District, known as the District of Columbia. By presidential proclamation, George Washington placed the District at the lower end of the range.
Sideling Hill Creek is known as one of the healthiest stream systems in all of Maryland. Originating from the southwestern mountains of Pennsylvania, Sideling Hill Creek tumbles its way down the steep, forested, shale cliffs of western Maryland before it finally spills into the Potomac River. The preserve has several trails so visitors can explore the variety of species and natural communities that exist at Sideling Hill Creek Preserve.
Beaver Creek is 6 mi/9.7 km SE of Hagerstown near the Mt. Aetna Caverns, Appalachian Trail, and Wagners Crossroads. The Beaver Creek Fish Hatchery supplies trout to area streams and is fed by a warm spring.

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