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Article Archive >> Senior Life

Looking for a way to get to know your grandkids? Spend some time getting creative

Looking for a way to get to know your grandkids?
Spend some time getting creative

(ARA)- Grandparents have a special role in the lives of their grandchildren. They provide unconditional love and support, and they also serve as a link to the extended family and a child's history. A great way to spend one-on-one time with your grandkids is by passing on a craft, skill or special knowledge. It gives you an opportunity to talk, listen and get to know each other better.
Sewing is a fun skill to pass on that your grandchildren might not otherwise have a chance to experience. Kids are fascinated by today's sewing machines, and advanced technology like that found in Bernina's aurora 440 sewing and embroidery system. It makes it easier for new sewers to get the hang of using a sewing machine a lot quicker.
For example, Bernina recently introduced to the home sewer the world's first stitch regulator foot (BSR) with a sensor that "reads" the fabric. When the fabric moves, the foot sensor is activated and the stitches are regular and consistent. This allows the sewer to draw, "thread paint," or just write their name across a piece of fabric with ease. This technology is similar to that of a computer mouse. Features such as these, embroidery machines and digitizing software are interesting many young people in sewing as a creative outlet and means for expressing their individuality.
"Just mastering a straight seam gives kids a great feeling of accomplishment," says Gayle Hillert, vice president of education and training of Bernina of America. Using other tools to add special touches to their projects only adds to the pride they feel. Embellishing clothing--taking purchased clothes and adding special touches like embroidery or sparkles to make them unique--is very popular right now. "Imagine how excited your grandkids will be if they can spell out their name in stitches with the BSR foot, or digitize a design of their choosing with software," says Hillert.
Use these tips and you and your grandchildren can spend memorable time together creating something special.
* When choosing a project to work on with your grandkids, consider letting them help you pick the project to ensure that it's something they'll want to work on. Keep in mind that their attention span is short, and depending on age, their manual dexterity might make certain tasks difficult for them.
* Be sure to allow plenty of extra time to complete the project and avoid frustration for either of you. You might want to brake the project up into several manageable parts and take a break for lunch or a snack. There are many easy projects that you can share with your grandkids--a simple stuffed animal, a pillow, even a quilt. Visit the Bernina Web site at www.berninausa.com and look under Sewing Studio to find a free project; you'll find basic sewing instruction under Basic Training.
* Make sure the project is age appropriate. A younger child might enjoy working on a stuffed animal while an older one might like to design a project of their own. A younger child might also need to sit up on a phone book or the foot control may need to be raised instead.
* To avoid injuries to inexperienced sewers, Bernina offers a finger guard that helps protect against needle injuries and is great for use with children as well as for people with disabilities.
* Supervise all stitching and cutting and if necessary have items cut and prepared ahead of time, all ready to go when your grandchild arrives.
* Another thing to think about when working with younger sewers is that they want to dig right in. Use "sewing rules" sparingly and get the party started to engage your grandchild's interest right away!
* Smile, encourage, enjoy!

Courtesy of ARA Content

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